Michigan Supreme Court Orders Michigan Economic Development Corporation Reveal Every GM Subsidy

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation must fully disclose the total value of taxpayer subsidies it has offered to General Motors, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled.

The court’s unanimous opinion in Sole v. MEDC held the MEDC must disclose, without redactions, the total amount of corporate subsidies promised to GM.

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Commentary: President Biden Sides Against Union Rank-and-File

While rank-and-file union members embraced President Trump, virtually every major union endorsed Joe Biden. A quietly issued Labor Department regulation helps explain this disconnect. President Biden has put union leaders first — even at the expense of union members.

Late last year, the Labor Department rescinded Trump Administration union transparency regulations. These regulations would have required union trust funds — like apprenticeship funds and strike funds — to disclose their receipts and expenditures.

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General Motors, MEDC Aim to Fool Michigan Taxpayers with Bait and Switch: Analyst

General Motors (GM) garnered national headlines when it promised to invest $6.5 billion in Michigan, but the people negotiating the deal’s claw back provisions might only require GM meet half of that investment and 80% of the original job creation promise, despite taxpayers still footing an $824 million subsidy.

When in front of the press, GM and Michigan promised the factory would support 4,000 jobs and retain another 1,000 – a cost of about $206,000 per job created, and if it failed, Michigan could claw back a sizeable portion of that money.

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General Motors Announces $7 Billion Investment for Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Michigan

Automobile maker General Motors on Tuesday announced a new, $7 billion investment in Michigan to expand manufacturing capacity for electric vehicles and batteries.

According to projections released by the company, the investment will create 4,000 new jobs, while retaining an additional 1,000.

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Toyota Smashes GM’s 90-Year Streak as Top U.S. Car Seller

Japanese automaker Toyota overtook General Motors in 2021 as the top car seller in the U.S., breaking the American manufacturer’s 90-year streak, Reuters reported.

Toyota sold 2.332 million vehicles, while GM sold 2.218 million, automakers said Tuesday, Reuters reported. GM’s dethroning marks the first time the Detroit company did not secure the most sales since it overtook Ford in 1931.

GM‘s sales were down 13% from the year before, in part due to the computer chip shortage that forced manufacturers to focus on their most popular models, Reuters reported. In contrast, Toyota was up 10% and is believed to have weathered the shortage better than others in the industry.

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Commentary: Unions Aligning with America First

After intense negotiations, the United Auto Workers secured a new agreement with Ford, General Motors, and their suppliers that effectively prohibits a vaccine mandate for employees by requiring only “voluntary” disclosure of vaccination status for union members. This hard-won validation for workers points to a larger opportunity for the America First movement and organized labor to acknowledge that they are natural allies.

On critical issues ranging from medical privacy to border security and foreign trade, the emerging populist and nationalist consensus of the New Right creates an obvious home for unionized Americans. The America First cause can, in turn, help revitalize private-sector unions and guarantee a more prosperous society for our country, with a stronger middle class through a better diffusion of economic and political power.

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General Motors to Shut Down Production at Most North American Plants Due to Chip Shortage

General Motors Baltimore Operations Plant Tour with Sec. Hilda Solis by Jay Baker at Baltimore, MD.

General Motors will shut down production at the majority of its North American plants for up to two weeks due to a worldwide chip shortage, the Detroit Free Press reported.

A fraction of GM plants will remain open to continue making its most profitable vehicles with the chips GM has on hand, according to Detroit Free Press. The lack of chips is a worsening problem, with surging COVID-19 cases in Southeast Asia creating lasting issues for automakers.

“All the announcements we made today are related to the chips shortage, the only plant down that’s not related to that, is Orion Assembly,” GM spokesperson Dan Flores told Detroit Free Press, referring to the Chevy Bolt recall affecting the latter plant.

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Big Three Automakers Reinstate Mask Mandates for All Workers

America’s largest automobile manufacturers, along with United Auto Workers (UAW), will require all employees to wear masks again starting Wednesday.

The decision was made by a COVID-19 task force comprised of health officials from UAW, Ford, General Motors and Stellantis, which manufactures Dodge and Chrysler vehicles. All workers, both vaccinated and unvaccinated, have to wear masks at plants, office buildings, and warehouses, UAW announced in a statement Tuesday.

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Largest U.S. Automaker General Motors Plans to be Carbon Neutral by 2040

General Motors announced that it plans to eliminate emissions from new light-duty vehicles by 2035 and go completely carbon neutral by 2040.

General Motors (GM), the largest automaker in the U.S., announced plans Thursday to go completely carbon neutral globally and produce an all-electric lineup of vehicles by 2040, according to a press release. GM also joined fellow U.S. automaker Ford Motor Company and more than 380 other companies, signing onto the United Nations (UN) “Business Ambition for 1.5 C” climate petition.

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Former Senior UAW Official Sentenced to 28 Months in Prison for Taking $1.5 Million in Bribes

A former high-level official in the United Auto Workers’ (UAW) General Motors Department was sentenced to 28 months in federal prison last week for taking more than $1.5 million in bribes and kickbacks.

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GM Strike Cost Automaker Estimated $3 Billion, $18.5 Million in Lost Michigan Income Tax Revenue

The United Auto Workers’ strike against General Motors cost the company $1 billion in earnings and that number is expected to rise to $3 billion on the year, CEO Mary Barra said in a phone call with investors this week.

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Report Estimates $9.1 Million in Lost Michigan Income Tax Revenue Caused by UAW Strike

A new estimate from the Lansing-based Anderson Economic Group predicts that the United Auto Workers (UAW) strike against General Motors has “jumped from impacting the initial 49,000 UAW workers to nearly 150,000 throughout the U.S. auto industry.”

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United Auto Workers Calls National Strike Against General Motors

The United Auto Workers announced Sunday that local union leaders from across the country voted to go on strike after its collective bargaining agreement with General Motors expired Saturday night.

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