Recommended: Great Books to Resist Cultural Indoctrination

Those classics that are called the Great Books are most closely associated with Mortimer J. Adler and Robert Hutchins.1 When Hutchins became president of the University of Chicago in 1929, he hired Adler to teach philosophy in the law school and the psychology department. Upon arriving, Adler, rather brashly he admits, recommended to Hutchins a program of study for undergraduates using classic texts. Adler had taught in the General Honors program at Columbia University begun in 1921 by professor John Erskine. Hutchins asked him for a list of books to be read in such a program. When Hutchins saw the list, he told Adler that he had not encountered most of them during his student years at Oberlin College and Yale University. Hutchins later wrote that unless Adler “did something drastic he [Hutchins, referring to himself] would close his educational career a wholly uneducated man.”2 Hutchins remained president for 16 years before serving as chancellor until 1951, and the following year, they did something drastic.

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Golden Globes Host Ricky Gervais Roasts Hollywood ‘Perverts’: ‘Let’s All Have a Laugh at Your Expense’

British comedian and actor Ricky Gervais, in his fifth time hosting the annual Golden Globe Awards, used his opening speech to roast many of the most famous actors and filmmakers in the room and criticize the elitist mindset of Hollywood.

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Review: ‘Richard Jewell’ Is Clint Eastwood’s Latest Portrayal of the Greatness of Ordinary Americans

Something really interesting is happening at Malpaso Productions, Clint Eastwood’s movie production company. Eastwood’s films, especially in recent years, portray the best in the American character through real stories of ordinary Americans called by events to stand up and shine. In his latest, “Richard Jewell,” Eastwood continues exploring a theme I’ve called “American Greatness in the Shadow of 9/11.” The result is a body of work that is awe-inspiring and unlike anything we have seen before in American cinema.

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Commentary: Ford v Ferrari and the Virtue of Courage

There is a scene in the terrific new film Ford v Ferrari where Henry Ford II grills his lieutenant Lee Iaccoca about the failed bid to acquire Enzo Ferrari’s racing car enterprise. Ford learns that Ferrari has a message for him, and Iacocca dutifully delivers: “He said Ford makes ugly little cars in ugly factories.”

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Mr. Rogers, Frozen and a NYPD Detective Wait for You on Movies to Watch This Weekend

Mr. Rogers will not be on PBS this Friday. Instead, he will be on your big screen as Tom Hanks who portrays him and the friendship he had with journalist Tom Junod. The journalist and television star developed this friendship after Junod was assigned to profile Rogers.

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Movies to Watch This Weekend: Fast Cars, Crime Fighting Women and a Con Man Being Changed

An American car designer Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon) and British driver Ken Miles (Christian Bale) put personal issues aside and fight against corporate interest to build a fast car for the Ford Motor Company. To truly test the car’s speed, the two take on Enzo Ferrari’s cars at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966.

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A Black and White Film, a Cop Movie and Deadly App Are on This Weekend’s Movies to Watch

This film follows the story of two lighthouse keepers (Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe) in the 1890s who try to not go crazy while living on a secluded and mysterious New England Island. However, these two lonely gentlemen start to lose their minds and become affected by their worst nightmares.

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A New ‘Joker,’ an Out-of-this-World Drama, and a Mountaintop Adventure Are at the Movies This Weekend

  A Joker, an astronaut, and group of climbers await you at the movie theaters this weekend. Joker: What some people consider the movie of the year, Joker hit the big screen Friday telling the origin story of Gotham City’s favorite villain. Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix), a failed comedian, is…

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Movies to Watch This Weekend

In 2003, British intelligence specialist Katharine Gun (Keira Knightley) gets a memo from the NSA detailing how Great Britain is helping America gather compromising information of U.N. Security Council members so they will vote in favor of the Iraq War. Trying to avoid seeing a war happen, Gun defies her government and releases the memo to the press.

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REVIEW: New Book Exposes Who and How Brett Kavanaugh Was Defamed

The Left’s crusade to destroy Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh isn’t over yet. Last week, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) sent a letter to the National Archives to demand the release of any records related to Kavanaugh’s tenure in the George W. Bush White House from 2001 to 2006.

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Movies to Watch This Weekend

Twelve-year-old best friends Max (Jacob Tremblay), Lucas (Keith L. Williams) and Thor (Brady Noon) are getting ready to participate in their first “kissing party,” but the problem is that none of them know how to kiss girls. When they can’t find a way to learn, Max decides to use his father’s drone to spy on teenage girls next door. However, plans don’t go according to plan when he loses the drone. Thus, the group of friends come up with an idea to get the drone back.

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Banks, Boogeymen, and Birds Are Waiting for You at the Movies

This movie tells the true story of Brian Banks (Aldis Hodge), a highly acclaimed football recruit, who had his football dreams taken away from him by a false rape accusation charge. Despite a lack of evidence, he received 10 years of prison and probation. However, years later and after an overturned conviction, Banks is released from prison and tries to fulfill his football dreams.

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Netfilx’s New Film Release ‘Secret Obsession’ Exposes California’s Dumb Gun Laws

When Netflix’s bland new psychological thriller “Secret Obsession” was released last week, I never expected keen political insights, let alone a unique cinematic twist. (Warning: Some spoilers ahead.) Under closer scrutiny, however, the film solidifies the need for individual rights, and presents a damning picture of California’s unconstitutional gun laws.

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