Former Obama-Biden Admin Official Behind Chicago’s $66M COVID Hospital That Treated Just 38 People

The city of Chicago spent $66 million turning McCormick Place — the largest convention center in North America — into a coronavirus hospital.

Although the facility treated a mere 38 patients during its month of operation, Chicago’s deputy mayor for economic development and Northwestern University trustee and former Obama administration official Samir Mayekar doubled down on his support of the hospital.

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Commentary: COVID-19 Lockdowns Have Created a New Feudalism

On February 28, the idea of locking down and smashing economies and human rights the world over was unthinkable to most of us but lustily imagined by intellectuals hoping to conduct a new social/political experiment. On that day, New York Times reporter Donald McNeil released a shocking article: To Take On the Coronavirus, Go Medieval on It. 

He was serious. Most all governments – with few exceptions like Sweden and the Dakotas in the US – did exactly that. The result has been shocking. I’ve previously called it the new totalitarianism. 

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Prayer at Tomb of the Patriarchs for Trump’s Success

Hours before the US election, the heads of local authorities in Judea and Samaria will hold a prayer service at the Tomb of the Patriarchs in Hebron for the success of incumbent President Donald Trump in the election.

The head of the Mount Hebron Council, Yohai Damari, explained this morning, Sunday, that the prayer stems first and foremost from gratitude to Trump for his efforts on behalf of the Land of Israel.

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Netflix Raising US Streaming Prices Amid Booming Growth

Netflix is raising most of its U.S. prices by 8% to 13% as its video streaming service rides a wave of rising popularity spurred by government-imposed lockdowns that corralled people at home during the fight against the pandemic.

The increases imposed Friday boost the cost of Netflix’s most popular U.S. streaming plan by $1 to $14 per month, while a premium plan that allows more people to watch the service on different screens simultaneously will now cost $2 more at $18 per month. Netflix’s basic U.S. plan remains at $9 per month. It marks Netflix’s first price changes in the U.S. since an increase rolled out early last year.

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Commentary: The Unelected Tyrants Who Burned Down the Golden State

If this seems like an unfair title, it isn’t, though some of these tyrants were appointed by elected politicians. And all of these tyrants rely on laws that were passed by elected politicians. But while there is plenty of blame to go around, tyranny is what Californians have endured. A tyrannical system is entirely to blame for apocalyptic fires that are wiping out California’s forests, fouling the air, and killing everything in their path.

So who are these unelected tyrants?

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Another Professor Resigns After Pretending to Be Non-White

Dr. Kelly Kean Sharp, a white assistant professor at Furman University resigned Tuesday, after university officials investigated an allegation that she pretended to be a non-white Latina, The Daily Caller reports.

An anonymous essay posted on the blog website Medium claimed the African American Scholar had been posing as Chicana, a term used to describe an American woman of Mexican descent, InsideHigherEd reported.

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Lindsey Graham Says He Will Be ‘Shocked’ if Durham Probe Doesn’t Lead to More Indictments

Sen. Lindsey Graham said Sunday he will be “shocked” if a Justice Department probe into the origins of the Trump-Russia investigation does not lead to more indictments.

In an interview on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures,” Graham also said that John Durham, the U.S. attorney leading the investigation, will release a report on his findings after the election.

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Federal Government Defends Eviction Ban in Court Hearing

The federal government defended its national eviction ban before a judge Friday, arguing that the moratorium had helped prevent the spread of COVID-19 and did not overstep the authority provided by Congress.

The arguments are part of a federal lawsuit filed by a handful of landlords in Memphis earlier this year, which claims the eviction moratorium has unfairly strained their finances and violated their property rights.

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Over 30 Illegal Immigrants in Texas Who ‘Threaten Public Safety’ Arrested in One Week

A five-day operation in south Texas resulted in 0ver 30 arrests of illegal immigrants with criminal backgrounds deemed possible public security threats, border officials announced Thursday.

The operation targeted illegal immigrants who allegedly pose a threat to public safety and are subject to deportation, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

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Commentary: Silicon Valley Titans Lie Again as Congress Meekly Looks On

After a series of mishaps involving muted senators, virtual cross-talk, and “connectivity issues” befuddling one of the world’s most tech-savvy men, the CEOs of Facebook, Twitter, and Google appeared before the Senate Commerce Committee on Wednesday for what has now become a performative ritual: senators of both parties yell about different aspects of social media, the tech giants respond with bland, vague, noncommittal statements. And nothing substantive happens.

This is exactly where the Senate Commerce Committee found itself on Wednesday, when Big Tech was confronted with a host of critics and without any defenders—but ultimately very little in the way of committed follow-up from legislators.

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Judge Postpones Trump’s TikTok Ban in Suit Brought by Users

A federal judge has postponed President Donald Trump’s threatened shutdown of the popular short-form video app TikTok, siding with a Pennsylvania comedian and two other TikTok creators who say Trump’s order hampers their free speech.

U.S. District Judge Wendy Beetlestone on Friday blocked an upcoming Commerce Department action that would have effectively banned TikTok in the U.S. by cutting it off from vital technical services.

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Commentary: A DOJ Roadblock to America’s Big Tech Beatdown?

It’s safe to say that Big Tech hasn’t had a great month.

Google received a beating at the Supreme Court for allegedly stealing the coding needed to create Android. Congress subpoenaed Facebook and Twitter for deliberately blocking news coverage potentially damaging to one political party — a move that culminated in a high-profile hearing yesterday. And now, the Department of Justice has charged Google with illegally maintaining its search and advertising monopoly.

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University of Michigan Native American, Latinx Groups Demand Required Courses on ‘Decolonial Pedagogy’

Two University of Michigan student interest groups have joined forces to make demands of school officials, including mandated classes focusing on “decolonial pedagogy.”

The Native American Student Association and La Casa sent their “United Statement” to UM Vice Provost for Equity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer Robert Sellers on “Indigenous Peoples’ Day,” October 12, The Michigan Daily reports.

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